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Intangible
#221 Posted : Sunday, August 16, 2020 8:04:52 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
Until an answer is given, this question needs to be asked at every opportunity!

The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#222 Posted : Thursday, August 27, 2020 6:41:30 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
"Trump inherited a stagnant economy" Larry Kudlow

The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#223 Posted : Monday, August 31, 2020 5:58:58 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
Republicans warn about America under Biden, but THIS is currently America under Trump!

The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#224 Posted : Saturday, September 5, 2020 9:29:10 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
In case you are confused...


The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#225 Posted : Thursday, September 17, 2020 9:32:33 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
It just never needed to be this way...

The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#226 Posted : Friday, October 9, 2020 10:13:48 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
Is he a business genius?


The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#227 Posted : Saturday, October 24, 2020 10:27:25 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
This is the list of shame. ALL of these Republicans gave a reasoned answer not to hold hearings on Obama's SCOTUS nomination. They are all lying, two faced, self serving, anti American, traitors to The People. Spread this list far and wide!

Sen. Cory Gardner (R-Col.): “I think we’re too close to the election. The president who is elected in November should be the one who makes this decision.”

Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas):“I believe the American people deserve to have a voice in the selection of the next Supreme Court Justice, and the best way to ensure that happens is to have the Senate consider a nomination made by the next President.

Sen. Ted Cruz (R-Texas): “It has been 80 years since a Supreme Court vacancy was nominated and confirmed in an election year. There is a long tradition that you don’t do this in an election year.”

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.): “If an opening comes in the last year of President Trump’s term, and the primary process has started, we’ll wait to the next election” (This was actually what he said in 2018, doubling down on his previous stance. )

Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.): “I don’t think we should be moving on a nominee in the last year of this president’s term — I would say that if it was a Republican president .”
Sen. Jim Inhofe (R-Okla.): “It makes the current presidential election all that more important as not only are the next four years in play, but an entire generation of Americans will be impacted by the balance of the court and its rulings.

Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa): “A lifetime appointment that could dramatically impact individual freedoms and change the direction of the court for at least a generation is too important to get bogged down in politics. The American people shouldn’t be denied a voice.”

Sen. Joni Ernst (R-Iowa): “We will see what the people say this fall and our next president, regardless of party, will be making that nomination.”

Sen. Thom Tillis (R-N.C.): “Vice President Biden’s remarks may have been voiced in 1992, but they are entirely applicable to 2016. The campaign is already under way. It is essential to the institution of the Senate and to the very health of our republic to not launch our nation into a partisan, divisive confirmation battle during the very same time the American people are casting their ballots to elect our next president.”

Sen. David Perdue (R-Ga.): “The very balance of our nation’s highest court is in serious jeopardy. As a member of the Senate Judiciary Committee, I will do everything in my power to encourage the president and Senate leadership not to start this process until we hear from the American people.”

Sen. Tim Scott (R-S.C.): “The next President must nominate successor that upholds constitution, founding principles.”

Sen. Ron Johnson (R-Wisc.): “I strongly agree that the American people should decide the future direction of the Supreme Court by their votes for president and the majority party in the U.S. Senate.”

Sen. Pat Toomey (R-Penn.): “The next Court appointment should be made by the newly-elected president.”

Sen. Richard Burr (R-N.C.): “In this election year, the American people will have an opportunity to have their say in the future direction of our country. For this reason, I believe the vacancy left open by Justice Antonin Scalia should not be filled until there is a new president.”

Sen. Roy Blunt (R-Mo.): “The Senate should not confirm a new Supreme Court justice until we have a new president.”

Sen. John Hoeven (R-N.D.): “There is 80 years of precedent for not nominating and confirming a new justice of the Supreme Court in the final year of a president’s term so that people can have a say in this very important decision.”

Sen. Rob Portman (R-Ohio): “I believe the best thing for the country is to trust the American people to weigh in on who should make a lifetime appointment that could reshape the Supreme Court for generations. This wouldn’t be unusual. It is common practice for the
Senate to stop acting on lifetime appointments during the last year of a presidential term, and it’s been nearly 80 years since any president was permitted to immediately fill a vacancy that arose in a presidential election year.”
The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#228 Posted : Tuesday, October 27, 2020 7:58:21 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
NYT bombshell reveals banks forgave $287 million in debt Trump failed to repay – and he never paid taxes on it

Over the past decade banks have forgiven about $287 million in loans from Donald Trump, after he failed to repay the debts. Not only did Trump benefit from banks approach to his failing businesses, a New York Times bombshell report reveals, but it appears the President failed to pay taxes on the forgiven loans, which the IRS sees as income.

“Big banks and hedge funds gave him years of extra time to repay his debts,” the Times reports. “Even after Mr. Trump sued his largest lender, accusing it of preying on him, the bank agreed to lend him another $99 million — more than twice as much as was previously known — so that he could pay back what he still owed the bank on the defaulted Chicago loan, records show.”

A previous New York Times report reveals Trump paid just $750 in taxes in 2016 and 2017, and nothing in taxes for a 15-year period surrounding those dates.

The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#229 Posted : Friday, October 30, 2020 6:52:46 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
Whatever your choice, get out and vote!

The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#230 Posted : Sunday, November 1, 2020 11:14:43 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
Please explain the differences...

The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#231 Posted : Friday, November 6, 2020 1:43:28 AM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
Donald Trump Jr. called for ‘total war’ — and people can’t look away from the meltdown

President Donald Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr. is having a conniption fit over the results of the election, claiming that because states are counting votes that they are somehow committing voter fraud.

His anger has grown so great that he called for a “total war.” Ironically, it’s something that many cities prepared for after the election results. When Twitter decided to put a disclaimer over the tweet, it sent Don Jr. further into a tizzy.

The move comes after former White House adviser Steve Bannon called for the beheading of FBI Director Christopher Wray and Dr. Anthony Fauci. Under normal circumstances, calling for the assassination of a public official results in charges, but it’s unclear if that will apply given Bannon is a prominent Trump ally.

Most of the non-Trump supporters were disgusted and concerned. Some did, however, turn to mockery.



The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#232 Posted : Sunday, November 8, 2020 9:43:22 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
This is a bit long, but worth reading. It was written by Robert Reich, former United States Secretary of Labor.

It’s over. Donald Trump is history.

For millions of Americans – a majority, by almost 5 million popular votes – it’s a time for celebration and relief. Trump’s cruelty, vindictiveness, non-stop lies, corruption, rejection of science, chaotic incompetence, and gross narcissism brought out the worst in America. He tested the limits of American decency and democracy. He is the closest we have come to a dictator.

Democracy has had a reprieve, a stay of execution. We have another chance to preserve it, and restore what’s good about America.


It will not be easy. The social fabric is deeply torn. Joe Biden will inherit a pandemic far worse than it would have been had Trump not played it down and refused to take responsibility for containing it, and an economic crisis exacting an unnecessary toll.

The worst legacy of Trump’s term of office is a bitterly divided America.

Judging by the number of ballots cast in the election, Trump’s base of support is roughly 70 million. They were angry even before the election (as were Biden supporters). Now, presumably, they are angrier.

The nation was already divided when Trump became president – by race and ethnicity, region, education, national origin, religion, and class. But he exploited these divisions to advance himself. He didn’t just pour salt into our wounds. He planted grenades in them.

It is a vile legacy. Although Americans have strongly disagreed over what we want the government to do, we at least agreed to be bound by its decisions. This meta-agreement required enough social trust for us to regard the views and interests of those we disagree with as equally worthy of consideration as our own. But Trump continuously sacrificed that trust to feed his own monstrous ego.

Elections usually end with losing candidates congratulating winners and graciously accepting defeat, thereby demonstrating their commitment to the democratic system over the particular outcome they fought to achieve.

But there will be no graciousness from Trump, nor a concession. He is incapable of either.


He will be president for another two and a half months. He is still charging that the election was stolen from him, mounting legal challenges and demanding recounts, maneuvers that could prevent states from meeting the legal deadline of December 8th for choosing electors.

If he continues, America could find itself in a situation similar to what it faced in 1876, when claims about ballot fraud forced a special electoral commission to decide the winner, just two days before the inauguration.

I wouldn’t be surprised if Trump refuses to attend Biden’s inauguration and stages a giant rally instead.

He’ll send firestorms of aggrieved messages to his followers – questioning Biden’s legitimacy and urging that they refuse to recognize his presidency. This will be followed by months of rallies and tweets containing even more outlandish charges: plots against Trump and America by Biden, Nancy Pelosi, “deep-state” bureaucrats, “socialists,” immigrants, Muslims, or any other of his standard foes.

It could go on for years, Trump keeping the nation’s attention, remaining the center of controversy and divisiveness, sustaining his followers in perpetual fury, titillating them with the possibility he might run again in 2024, making it harder for Biden to do any of the national healing he’s promised and the nation so desperately needs.

How can Biden heal the nation when Trump doesn’t want it healed?

The media (including Twitter, Facebook, and even Fox News) could help. They have begun to call out Trump’s lies in real time and cut off his press conferences, practices that should have started years ago. Let’s hope they continue to tag his lies and otherwise ignore him – a fitting end to a reality TV president who tried to turn America into a reality warzone.

But the responsibility for healing America falls to all of us.

For starters, we’d do well to recognize and honor the selflessness we have observed during this trying time – starting with tens of thousands of election workers who have worked long hours under difficult and sometimes dangerous circumstances.

Add to them the hospital workers across the nation saving lives from the scourge of Covid-19; the thousands of fire fighters in the west and the emergency responders on the Gulf coast battling the consequences of climate change; the civil servants getting
unemployment checks out to millions of jobless Americans; social workers dealing with family crises in the wake of evictions and other hardships; armies of volunteers doling out food from soup kitchens.

These are the true heroes of America. They embody the decency of this land. They are doing the healing, rebuilding trust, reminding us who we are and who we are not.

Donald Trump is not America.
The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#233 Posted : Friday, November 13, 2020 8:48:27 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
Trump is officially The Biggest Loser!

The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#234 Posted : Sunday, November 15, 2020 7:21:19 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
'It's critical' for Republican leaders to explain to voters Trump lost: John Bolton

President Donald Trump's former national security adviser urged Republican Party leaders Sunday to acknowledge and explain the presidential election result to their supporters rather than continuing to appease the president as he promotes baseless claims of voter fraud.

"I think as every day goes by, it's clearer and clearer there isn't any evidence," John Bolton said on ABC's "This Week," dismissing Trump's claim that President-elect Joe Biden's victory is illegitimate. "But if the Republican voters are only hearing Donald Trump's misrepresentations, it's not surprising that they believe it."

"It's critical for other Republican leaders to stand up and explain what actually happened: Donald Trump lost what, by any evidence we have so far, was a free and fair election," he continued.

The appeal from Bolton, who has been a sharp critic of the president's since leaving his national security post in September 2019, came on a morning during which Trump, via Twitter, made one of his first acknowledgements of President-elect Joe Biden's victory -- albeit while repeating his unsubstantiated claim that the election was rigged. He tweeted again to say that he was not conceding.

"How crucial is this period of presidential transition?" Raddatz asked.

"A new government cannot start on Jan. 20 from a standing-still position," Johnson said, noting that he personally visited Trump Tower four years ago to brief the former real estate mogul. "This is what transitions are for. Intelligence briefings, (presidential daily briefings), when you're in office -- in national security -- are your eyes and ears.

"So it's a disservice to the American public," he continued. "It's a disservice to our national security to make the incoming government wait until Jan. 20 to actually begin to get up to speed on a myriad of issues."

The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#235 Posted : Tuesday, November 17, 2020 11:56:00 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
Watch out when they get cornered...


The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#236 Posted : Thursday, November 19, 2020 9:21:54 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
Statewide audit upholds Biden victory in Georgia

A statewide audit of the presidential race in Georgia upholds President-elect Joe Biden’s victory there, Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger announced Thursday evening.

The audit tallied by hand all ballots, which were initially counted by machines. President Donald Trump’s campaign is still entitled to request a recount once the election results are certified. The state certification deadline is on Friday.

“Georgia’s historic first statewide audit reaffirmed that the state’s new secure paper ballot voting system accurately counted and reported results,” Raffensperger, a Republican, said in a statement announcing the result. “This is a credit to the hard work of our county and local elections officials who moved quickly to undertake and complete such a momentous task in a short period of time.”

The full audit, which is undertaken to check the accuracy of the machine count, found Biden ahead by just under 12,300 votes in the state. During the audit process, four counties — Floyd, Fayette, Douglas and Walton — found ballots that were not initially reported, either because they were never initially counted (which was the case in Floyd) or not uploaded correctly (the latter three counties). Those counties all reuploaded their results, which shrank Biden’s margin by around 1,400 votes, not enough to jeopardize his lead.

Raffensperger has been under withering criticism from members of his own party, who have alleged impropriety without providing any specific evidence. He has faced pressure from both the state’s Republican senators, Kelly Loeffler and David Perdue, to step down, while Rep. Doug Collins, a close ally of Trump, has been blistering in his criticism. But Raffensperger has stood firm and defended the integrity of the election, which election officials across the country say was secure and free from systemic fraud.

“This is not a political process. It’s really an accounting process, it’s adding up all the numbers and making sure they line up,” Raffensperger said in an interview with POLITICO on Wednesday afternoon.

Trump and his allies have spread significant misinformation about the Georgia voting process. The president wrongly claimed that signatures could not be verified in the state, while he and his team have falsely alleged that Dominion voting systems have switched votes away from him across the country. Earlier in the week, Raffensperger’s office announced the results of an audit of a random sample of the actual voting machines, which “found no evidence of the machines being tampered.”


The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#237 Posted : Thursday, November 26, 2020 7:29:21 PM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
Just a short reminder...

The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
Intangible
#238 Posted : Wednesday, December 2, 2020 12:27:20 AM
Rank: Advanced Member



Joined: 1/4/2010
Posts: 10,750
Location: on a hill in the hollow
Trump lawyer calls for fired cybersecurity chief's execution

It's not every day that a sitting president's lawyer calls for the execution of a government official who did nothing but capably serve his country.

Most Americans have probably never heard of the Department of Homeland Security's Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), but they have reason to be thankful for its work. As we recently discussed, CISA has spent the year combatting foreign interference in our elections, both by preventing attacks and by countering efforts to deceive the public.

The office has been led by Christopher Krebs, the nation's top cybersecurity official, who's earned bipartisan praise for his work. The Washington Post's David Ignatius recently noted, "When the history books about this election are written, Krebs will be one of the heroes."

Two weeks ago, Donald Trump fired Krebs for the Trumpiest of reasons: the president wanted the CISA to go along with ridiculous lies about the 2020 elections. When Krebs instead told the truth, he was shown the door.

In normal administrations, officials are fired if they're corrupt. In the Trump administration, officials are fired for failing to be corrupt.

The president's operation is apparently reluctant to let this go. Yesterday, Trump campaign lawyer Joe DiGenova appeared on a conservative radio show and said, "Anybody who thinks the election went well, like that idiot Krebs who used to be the head of cybersecurity, that guy is a class A moron. He should be drawn and quartered. Taken out at dawn and shot."

The comments were broadcast on the radio, simulcast on Newsmax, streamed on YouTube, and uploaded to Apple Podcasts and Spotify.

DiGenova's rhetoric did not escape Krebs' attention. In fact, the former CISA chief spoke this morning with NBC's Savannah Guthrie.

"It's certainly more dangerous language, more dangerous behavior," Krebs responded. "And the way I look at it is that we are a nation of laws, and I plan to take advantage of those laws. I've got an exceptional team of lawyers that win in court, and I think they're probably going to be busy." Asked if there may be legal action taken as a result of those comments, Krebs said his team is looking at their "available opportunities."


All of this, incidentally, comes just a few weeks after Steve Bannon posted a video in which the former presidential adviser called for the beheadings of FBI Director Christopher Wray and Dr. Anthony Fauci, the government's top infectious diseases expert.

The developments also raise questions anew about the ridiculousness of Trump's post-election legal team -- or the "elite, strike force team." The operation is led by Rudy Giuliani, fresh off his pre-election partnership with an active Russian agent, and Jenna Ellis, who, as recently as 2016, repeatedly described Trump as an "idiot," adding that she considered him an "unethical, corrupt, lying, criminal, dirtbag."

They were joined by Sydney Powell, whose crackpot conspiracy theories proved to be even too extreme for Team Trump, but Joe DiGenova is apparently still part of the operation, despite calling for Christopher Krebs' execution.

If I read it in a novel, I'd dismiss the plot as unrealistic.
The difference between patriotism and nationalism is that the patriot is proud of his country for what it does, and the nationalist is proud of his country no matter what it does; the first attitude creates a feeling of responsibility, but the second a feeling of blind arrogance that leads to war.
Sydney J. Harris
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